LATEST ADDITIONS

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 30, 2011  |  0 comments

While Terminator 2 might have introduced audiences around the world to the possibilities of computer-generated effects, it was Steven Spielberg’s 1993 smash Jurassic Park that truly revolutionised cinema. Seamlessly mixing CG visuals and life-size models, this bigscreen adaptation of Michael Crichton’s sci-fi bestseller convinced audiences around the world that dinosaurs walked still walked the Earth, and in the process transformed the visual effects industry almost overnight. And while the film itself suffers by comparison to Crichton’s darker novel (and some of the dinosaur info is extremely suspect – not least the oversized Velociraptors), taken on its own right, it’s an entertaining thrill ride full of wonder and terrific dinosaur effects.

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 23, 2011  |  0 comments

Dystopian, Blade Runner-esque futures are ten-a-penny in videogames. So it's hard not to feel a little jaded when yet another title turns up promising to take you into a perpetually overcast near-future version of our world, populated by sinister big-business types and shadowy conspiracies. But it's worth remembering that the original Deus Ex set the benchmark for the action-role-playing-game genre when it hit the PC at the turn of the Millennium. And, remarkably, this third entry in the series manages to match, if not top that lofty achievement.

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 19, 2011  |  0 comments

As far as movie taglines go ‘Inner city vs outer space’ is pretty damn snappy. Incredibly comedian-turned-filmmaker Joe Cornish has delivered a debut movie that more than lives up to it. 

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 16, 2011  |  0 comments

The undisputed king of the Biblical epics, William Wyler’s Ben-Hur may have turned 50 a couple of years ago, but it remains as fresh, exciting and spectacular as ever. Charlton Heston’s son Francis sums the film’s success up best in one of the accompanying extras, saying, ‘Ben-Hur, in a sense, I think was the first modern epic. It was realistic. It was, at times, gruesome. It had characters with flaws in them. It was complex. It was character driven-not event-driven’. And the film’s lasting impact can be felt across the past half-century of cinema, from the films of David Lean to The Phantom Menace’s pod race.

Mark Craven  |  Sep 15, 2011  |  0 comments

There's certainly no shortage of racing games around these days, nor any shortage of sub-par games based on existing movie properties. Which is why I was initially rather wary of trying out this latest offering from Disney Interactive. Given the rather lacklustre nature of the film it was based on (easily Pixar's worst to date) and the stiff competition from other console racers vying for gamers' attention I figured the best I could hope for would be something to could recommend to undemanding children. How wrong I was...

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 12, 2011  |  0 comments

George Lucas' space opera is arguably the defining event in modern cinema - one that reshaped Hollywood the films it produces. As such, it's pretty much unthinkable that anybody visiting this website isn't already incredibly familiar with the films (albeit, maybe not the fan-baiting, re-tweaked versions Lucas has prepared for this release). As such, it seems like there's very little point in going over them in any great depth. So let's quickly breeze through this bit, before getting stuck into the really juicy stuff about this Blu-ray boxset...

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 12, 2011  |  0 comments

While it’s a long way from the abject disaster that was At World’s End, this fourth Pirates of the Caribbean flick proves that the franchise still has a long way to go before it can re-capture the spirit of the original film.

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 05, 2011  |  0 comments

Is Japanese cinema’s enfant terrible finally growing up? To be honest, probably not. But 13 Assassins is undoubtedly Takashi (Audition, Ichi the Killer) Miike’s most assured and most mainstream film to date.

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 05, 2011  |  0 comments

If the 1980s were truly the decade of excess, then no film better encapsulates that than Scarface. With a script by Oliver Stone, direction by Brian De Palma and a barnstorming central performance by Al Pacino, this loose remake of Howard Hawks’ acclaimed 1930s gangster film is anything but subtle as it plays out the almost Shakespearean tragedy of Tony Montana, a small-time hood from Cuba who arrives in Florida with dreams of making it big, only to end up self-destructing under the weight of his ego, a mountain of cocaine and some rather odd feelings for his sister. Great stuff.

Anton van Beek  |  Sep 03, 2011  |  0 comments

Taking its inspiration from Jewish religious work the Book of Enoch, this unusual videogame charts the adventures of Noah's great-grandfather Enoch on a Heaven-sent quest to save the world from seven fallen angels.

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