AV Receivers

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Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
No lightweight… This slimline AVR re-imagines home cinema for the network age. Steve May hums The Times They Are a-Changin’…

Whether through luck or design, Marantz has created something rather special with the NR1602. Driven by a desire to innovate within the often stultifying constraints of hardcore AV, the company has taken the traditional hefty AVR form factor and chopped it in half. The result is a component with a good deal more va-va-voom than its peers.

Steve May  |  Mar 28, 2013  |  0 comments

AV receivers are too big, too complicated and too damn old school. That’s the unspoken truth for a generation weaned on portable devices and wireless widgets. While home cinephiles will rightfully defend an opposing view, the fact is that for many, 
AVRs have simply become an irrelevance.  

Steve May  |  Mar 04, 2014  |  0 comments

If traditional home cinema is to flourish, it needs AV receivers like the Marantz NR1604. It’s no secret that real-world consumers have fallen out of love with the surround sound behemoths of yesteryear – incredible hulks just don’t cut it anymore (unless they’re green gamma-soaked scientists). Home audio has downsized dramatically, and AVRs have been slow to follow suit. Just as well then, that this third iteration of Marantz’ slim-line NR models is, simply put, the best yet. When it comes to form, functionality and outright fun the NR1604 pretty much nails it.  It goes without saying that by its nature this style of receiver isn’t so much about reckless performance, as usability (an often ignored phrase in the hedonistic world of home theatre). The dinosaur, it seems, is evolving.

Steve May  |  Sep 06, 2014  |  0 comments

The Marantz NR1605 is the latest update to the brand's increasingly popular slimline AVR line. With sales of traditional home cinema receivers shrinking faster than the crown jewels of a skinny-dipping Inuit, AV brands have been looking for ways to curry favour with disenchanted cinemaniacs. One solution is to add Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, the other is to embrace a leaner form factor. Here Marantz has done both. 

Steve May  |  Jan 16, 2019  |  0 comments
Marantz updates its long-running NR flagship for vinyl revivalists and Alexa addicts...
Mark Craven  |  Dec 06, 2019  |  0 comments
The Marantz NR1710 is the latest space-saving AVR to roll off the production line, designed, says the brand, to bring the 'Marantz sound' to living room environments where, often, a full-size receiver dare not tread. But at £600, it's pricier than some rival machines with more boisterous specs. Should you put your discs on a diet?
Steve May  |  Apr 01, 2021  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3The affordable Marantz NR receiver could meet all your cinema and gaming needs, says Steve May

The latest in Marantz's now long-established slimline, half-height receiver range, the NR1711 is a bijou behemoth for those of us who don't require unhinged power, but do want advanced connectivity to best work with modern wired and wireless sources.

Steve May  |  Nov 20, 2019  |  0 comments
With a feature checklist as long as your arm, the SR6014 is the real-world star of Marantz’s 2019 
AV receiver lineup, says Steve May
Ed Selley  |  Nov 30, 2010  |  0 comments
Marantz reloaded With the SR7005 Marantz has shaken off its reputation for staid amp performance and is now a home cinema supremo, as Richard Stevenson discovers

I confess that I have never really been excited by Marantz’s AV receivers. They were never ahead of the features game and always aired too much on the side of sonic caution for my liking. Safe, reliable, solid and about as exciting as endurance snail racing. When the SR7005 arrived I brewed a really fresh cup of Horlicks, put my slippers on and settled down for an evening of light entertainment.

Richard Stevenson  |  Nov 23, 2018  |  0 comments
With Dolby Atmos, DTS:X and Auro-3D, Marantz’s SR7012 is one of a handful of receivers to boast this trio of sonic processing suites straight out of the box. One step down and considerably more affordable than the brand’s flagship SR8012 AVR, could this £1,000 model be the sweet spot for object-based audio value?
Ed Selley  |  Apr 30, 2015  |  0 comments

For many years, the general perception of the Canadian brand NAD might best have been summed up as ‘workmanlike.’ Behind that rather prosaic grey livery, the engineering was solid, reliable and normally very effective but rarely did it cause a huge amount of excitement. This isn’t to say there haven’t been some great NAD products – there have been several, including the predecessors to the models on test here – but the brand was about worth rather than superficial excitement.

Jamie Biesemans  |  Dec 04, 2020  |  0 comments
hcchighreccomendJamie Biesemans wonders if this flagship nine-channel model points the way forward for AVR design

NAD's new T 778 features a large touchscreen display, mirroring the design of its two-channel M10 and M33 amplifiers. It's a standout feature, suited to a world dominated by smartphones. But does it actually make this 9.1 AVR any better?

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
Raw power, no frills Richard Stevenson auditions the wild child of audio visual receivers and finds that this non-conformist is a credit to the NAD lineage

NAD is not a brand to follow the masses. In fact, while the AVR herd are grazing on features and connecting to the milking machine of network integration, NAD receivers are more ‘free range’. The T757 goes a step further and is truly feral. What we have here is a significantly wallet-wrenching AV receiver that has thrown off what are considered basic features on even budget models costing one-fifth of the price. Instead, this chunky beast concentrates on sonic performance, delivering your speakers an ultra- clean analogue signal designed to make your ears love you. I would even go so far as to say that its dark grey exterior and clean lines make it the best-looking NAD receiver yet, too.

Mark Craven  |  Oct 07, 2020  |  0 comments
This 5.1 combi system doesn't offer much mileage from its onboard 3D audio decoding, but in other ways it offers solid value for money, reckons Mark Craven

All-in-one home cinema systems, which were the darlings of the AV market at the turn of the century, have fallen so far out of fashion that practically all manufacturers have given up on them. At first glance, you might think Onkyo's HT-S3910 is a lone holdout against the soundbar revolution, but then you clock that it lacks the integrated disc player that made all-in-one systems so convenient.

Danny Phillips  |  May 02, 2012  |  0 comments

The bigger brother of the TX-NR709 (reviewed in HCC 202), Onkyo’s TX-NR1009 boasts a bulkier frame, greater muscle and a fuller spec sheet – including a claimed 9 x 180W power output (into 6Ohms) and DTS Neo:X, the latest audio mode to deliver extra front height and width channels.

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